IONA INGLESBY’s EMAIL:
You could technically get a person DNA tested and then create a recipe that they are genetically pre-disposed to liking, and, as genes are inherited, there is a big chance that their parents and grandparents will like it too. So you might find that an old family recipe matches this already – which is why is has naturally become a family classic.
And how cool to go to a Restaurant “DNA Dining” where you turn up, put in your genetic data, and they give you the food which they know you’re going to like the best!

These guys in California have done just that – but for making a wine that you will genetically be suggested to like: Vinome

 
Bildschirmfoto 2016-05-14 um 11.37.08

All taken from 23andme report: (these are things about food they can tell you if you take their test)

Response to Diet:

“What you eat has a huge impact on your health, but how you respond to your diet is influenced by many factors. Researchers are learning that genetics plays a large role in how people perceive flavors and in their eating behaviors. Genetics also influences how your body metabolizes and uses different foods, perhaps helping to explain why some people can eat as much as they want and never gain weight while others can’t seem to lose weight despite their best efforts.”

Bitter taste perception:
“Sensitivity to bitter tastes is highly heritable. High heritability means that the trait is controlled almost entirely by your genes—environmental factors play little or no role.”
 

Lactose Intolerance: 

“An adult’s ability to produce the lactase enzyme is determined almost entirely by his or her genes.”
 

Coriander (Cilantro) aversion: 

“A study of roughly 76,000 individuals of European ancestry who participated in 23andMe research surveys identified a genetic marker associated with disliking the taste of fresh (not dried) cilantro.”
 

Sweet Taste preferance:

“A study of roughly 120,000 individuals of European ancestry who participated in 23andMe research surveys identified a genetic marker associated with preferring sweet foods over salty or savory foods. The marker rs838133 is located within a gene called FGF21 that plays important roles in metabolism. Individuals with the AA genotype at rs838133 had about 1.1 times higher odds of preferring sweet foods, compared to individuals with the AG genotype. Individuals with the GG genotype had about 1.1 times lower odds of preferring sweet foods.”
 
 
Brief articles about genetics and food preference:
 
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